HPA 430 Penn State University Self Assessment Essay

Write a 2-3 page self-assessment of your strengths and weaknesses using the ideas on leadership competencies from our textbook, NCHL, and ACHE. You should discuss at least three areas of strength and three areas of weakness. Your essay should explain with reference to behaviors and life experiences why you think you have a strength or weakness in these areas with personal experiences. In other words, what have you done that shows your competence in this area or that shows you have some challenges?

Transformatio
National Center for Healthcare Leadership
Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
updated, career-spanning
competency model
for health sector leaders
Report version 1.03
How to Cite This Paper
Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0. Chicago, Illinois: National Center for Healthcare Leadership; 2018.
(Available at nchl.org)
License Grant
The NCHL Health Leadership Competency Model is protected by copyright laws, international copyright treaties, and other
intellectual property laws and treaties. The Health Leadership Competency Model is licensed on a non-exclusive basis. You
may download and use the Health Leadership Competency Model on computers within your organization, and may use the
Health Leadership Competency Model for internal, non-commercial purposes, including without limitation internal
educational or professional certification activities, only. If you would like to use the Health Leadership Competency
Model for any other purposes, you must obtain prior written approval from NCHL, and must pay the applicable
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limiting the foregoing, this Agreement does not grant you any rights to (and you are prohibited from): (i) granting any
sublicense, distributing or transmitting the Health Leadership Competency Model in whole or in part; (ii) modifying the
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Copyright 2018 | National Center for Healthcare Leadership
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical,
including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission.
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National Center for Healthcare Leadership
Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of Contents
3
Aknowledgements
4
Executive Summary
5
Figure 1 | Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
5
Introduction
6
About the Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
7
Table 1 | NCHL Competency Domains
8
Table 2 | NCHL Competency Definitions
9
Action Competency Domains
10
Boundary Spanning
11
Execution
15
Relations
24
Transformation
30
Enabling Competency Domains
35
Values
36
Health System Awareness & Business Literacy
38
Self-Awareness & Self-Development
42
About the National Center for Healthcare Leadership
46
About the Rush University HSM Leadership Center
46
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[ 3 ]
Acknowledgements
The National Center for Healthcare Leadership is grateful to the many healthcare leaders who supported this revision and revalidation
effort. This includes the following individuals who participated as interviewees and/or participants in one or more focus groups and
those who recommended participants for the interviews. We would also like to thank the hundreds of anonymous participants who
volunteered to complete our validation surveys. This initiative would not have been successful without your participation.
Pamela Abner, Mount Sinai Health System
Paula Brown, Rush University Medical Center
Aimee Allbritton, PhD, Memorial Health System
Faye Campo, Ochsner Health System
Conan Dickson, Johns Hopkins Medicine
Joni Duncan, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
Ajani Dunn, Mayo Clinic
Joseph Fournier, Intermountain Healthcare
Andrea Paciello, Massachusetts General Hospital
Michael Grubich, Aurora Health Care
Jan Harrington-Davis, Henry Ford Health System
Laurie Jensen, Henry Ford Health System
Susan Lawler, PhD, Rush University Medical Center
Daniel Lehman, UNC Healthcare
Linda McHugh, Cleveland Clinic
Gary Mecklenburg, Waud Capital Partners
Le Joyce Naylor, Cleveland Clinic
Kathy Oswald, Henry Ford Health System
Alison Preston, UK Healthcare
Thomas Priselac, Cedars-Sinai Health System
[ 4 ]
Todd Redden, Atrium Health
Nancy Schlichting
Tara Wiedeman, Carilion Clinic
Theodore Witherell, Partners HealthCare
We also would like to thank Andrew N. Garman, PsyD and Melanie P. Standish of Rush University HSM Leadership Center and
Cassia K. Carter, Advocate Aurora Health for their outstanding efforts to research revise and revalidate the Health Leadership
Competency Model 3.0.
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Executive Summary
The National Center for Healthcare Leadership (NCHL) is pleased to provide you with a revised and revalidated version of our signature
interprofessional Health Leadership Competency Model. This new version 3.0 represents the work and input of hundreds of healthcare
leaders who volunteered their time to participate in interviews, focus groups, and survey responses as part of the revision and
validation process.
The organizing framework for the model is displayed in Figure 1. The revised model is organized around four “action” domains and three
“enabling” domains, which were derived from the current state-of-the-science in leadership development and performance research.
The “action” domains contain competencies relevant to the direct work of leaders on the job. These include Execution, Relations, and
Transformation, which parallel domains from the 2.1 model. Boundary Spanning was added to incorporate recent research in applied
settings underscoring the critical importance of leaders’ management interdepartmental and interorganizational relationships2.
The “enabling” domains involve core professional knowledge and self-awareness competencies that strengthen the effectiveness of
the “action” domains. These include: Health System Awareness & Business Literacy, Self-Awareness & Self-Development, and Values. These
domains represent the leader in the context of their preparation and development to effectively lead in their organization.
Collectively the model includes 28 core competencies, each with accompanying behavioral descriptions at multiple levels of
proficiency. The domain structure is designed to provide a user-friendly guide that can help practitioners first set high-level
development priorities, and then select specific competencies to focus on to strengthen their capabilities within that domain.
If your organization is interested in learning more about Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0, please contact info@nchl.org.
FIGURE 1
|
Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Enabling
Competency
Domains
(1)
Calhoun, Judith, et al, (2008). Development of an Interprofessional Competency Model for Healthcare Leadership. Journal of Healthcare Management. 53 (6), 375-389.
(2)
Yukl, Gary. (2012). Effective Leadership Behavior: What We Know and What Questions Need More Attention. Academy of Management Perspectives. 26 (4), 66-85.
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 5 ]
Introduction
Competency models provide an important cornerstone for designing strategically aligned learning programs. By specifying a
“language of performance,” they help learners and mentors improve the quality of goal-setting, feedback, and identification of
high-value learning activities that can accelerate leadership development. For more than a decade, NCHL has maintained an
interprofessional leadership competency model on behalf of the health sector to help support leadership development activities in
practice and academic settings of all kinds.
In 2017-2018, NCHL embarked on a substantial revision and revalidation of its core model. With support from faculty and staff of the HSM
Leadership Center at Rush University in Chicago, NCHL completed a four-phase process to ensure relevance of the revised model to highperforming leaders today, as well as the changing nature of leadership roles that are anticipated for the decade to come.
The first phase of this process involved a systematic scan of published future scenario assessments for the year 2030, from a breadth of US
and international sources from within and outside of healthcare. Trends identified from this scan were then vetted with focus groups of
healthcare executives involved in leadership development in a variety of settings.
Next, in-depth behavioral event interviews were conducted with paired-sample leaders representing different organizational and
performance levels, and the results were crosswalked with the current NCHL Health Leadership Competency Model 2.1. Current
research on leadership development was then reviewed to develop an evidence-based domain framework for the revised model.
Finally, the revised model was distributed via electronic survey to a broader sample of health leaders to establish content validity
and generalizability.
As competency-based education, training, and professional development have evolved and progressed over the years, their use is
critical to help respond to:
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Ever-changing challenges of the 21st century
Ongoing changes in practice environments and requirements
Development of standards for best practices
Interdisciplinary communications and interactions
Peer and self-assessments of performance
Communication across institutions, departments, service lines, and community-based partnerships
Long-term planning for human capital development and management as a key organizational asset
Career growth across health professions and career stages
Development of accreditation standards and criteria
Planning of educational and professional development programs across settings — classrooms, workplace, and distance-based formats
A health leadership model adds significant value to the field of management and clinical practice, and to faculty. While outstanding
health leaders have a lot in common with and demonstrate the behaviors of the best leaders of the top-performing organizations
worldwide, they do so in an industry and environment that call for a higher level of both competence and professional values, given
the specific context in which healthcare is provided, where the “end consumer” is ultimately all people.
Health is a mission- and values-driven industry that is extraordinarily complex and, more than other sector, requires building consensus
among independent constituencies, many of whom have broad social and political influence and impact.
Leaders who have an impact must exercise influence and consensus- and coalition-building competencies at higher levels than their
counterparts in other sectors. Finally, health leaders are especially challenged to create work climates that motivate high-quality,
patient-centered care and retain high-demand talent in a very competitive marketplace.
The NCHL Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0 reflects benchmarking against the best available evidence and thought
leadership outside of health, adapted to them to the unique health environment. It provides a standard of leadership excellence, and
translates it for improving professional development, organizational performance, health management education, and, ultimately, the
health of the population.
Cente
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About the Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0
The Health Leadership Competency Model 3.0 is comprised of seven domains containing four “action” domains and three
“enabling” domains.
The Action Competency Domains describe leaders in the context of doing their work. These include:




Execution
Relations
Transformation
Boundary Spanning
The Enabling Competency Domains describe preparation and development activities leaders need in order to effectively lead in the
context of their preparation and development to effectively lead in their organization. These include:
• Health System Awareness & Business Literacy
• Self-Awareness & Self-Development
• Values
Competencies under each domain are shown in Table 1. The definitions for each domain and the related competencies and
competency levels are provided in the following pages.
TA B L E 1
|
NCHL Competency Domains
ENABLING DOMAINS
AC TION DOMAINS
BOUNDARY
SPANNING
• Community
Collaboration
• Organizational
Awareness
• Relationship &
Network
Development
EXECUTION
• Accountability
• Achievement
Orientation
• Analytical Thinking
• Communication
Skills 1 – Writing
• Communication
RELATIONS
• Collaboration
• Impact & Influence
• Interpersonal
Understanding
• Talent
Development
TRANSFORMATION
VALUES
• Change Leadership
• Professional &
• Information
Social Responsibility
HEALTH SYSTEM
AWARENESS
& BUSINESS LITERACY
• Financial Skills
• Self-Awareness
• Human Resource
• Self-Confidence
Seeking
• Innovation
SELF-AWARENESS
& SELF-DEVELOPMENT
Management
• Information
• Strategic
Orientation
• Team Leadership
Skills 2 – Speaking
& Facilitating
• Initiative
• Performance
Measurement
• Process & Quality
Improvement
• Project
Management
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Technology
Management
• Well-Being
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TA B L E 2
|
NCHL Competency Definitions
HEALT H L EA DE RSH I P CO M P E T E N C Y M O DE L 3. 0
AC T I O N CO M P E T E NC Y D O MA I NS
B O U N DA RY S PA NNING
Optimizing relationships between a leader’s span of control and the departments, organizations, communities, and/or broader networks within which
it operates.
Community Collaboration – The ability to align one’s own and the organization’s priorities with the needs and values of the community, including
its cultural and ethnocentric values, and to move health forward in line with population-based wellness needs and national health agenda.
Organizational Awareness – The ability to understand and learn the formal and informal decision-making structures and power relationships in an
organization or industry (e.g., stakeholders, suppliers). This includes the ability to identify who the real decision makers are and the individuals who
can influence them, and to predict how new events will affect individuals and groups within the organization.
Relationship & Network Development – The ability to establish, build, and sustain professional contacts for the purpose of building networks of
people with similar goals and that support similar interests.
E X E C U TI O N
Translating vision and strategy into actions supporting optimal organizational performance.
Accountability – The ability to hold people accountable to standards of performance or ensure compliance by effectively and appropriately using the
power of one’s position or personality, with the long-term good of the organization in mind.
Achievement Orientation – A concern for surpassing standards of excellence. Standards may involve past performance (striving for improvement);
objective measures (results orientation); outperforming others (competitiveness); challenging goals, or redefining the nature of the standards
themselves (innovation).
Analytical Thinking – Developing a deeper understanding of a situation, issue, or problem by breaking it down or tracing its implications step-by-step.
It includes organizing the parts of a situation, issue, or problem systematically; making systematic comparisons of different features or aspects; setting
priorities on a rational basis; and identifying time sequences, causal relationships, or if-then relationships.
Communication Skills 1 – Writing – The ability to use written communications in formal and informal situations to convey meaning, build shared
understanding, and productively move agendas forward.
Communication Skills 2 – Speaking & Facilitating – The ability to use spoken communications in formal and informal situations to convey meaning,
build shared understanding, and productively move agendas forward.
[ 8 ]
Initiative – Identifying a problem, obstacle, or opportunity and taking action in light of this identification to address current or future problems or
opportunities. Initiative emphasizes proactively doing things and not simply thinking about future actions. Levels of proficiency relate to the time
scale of focus, moving from addressing current situations to acting on long-term future opportunities or problems.
Performance Measurement – The ability to understand and use statistical and financial metrics and methods to set goals and measure clinical as well
as organizational performance; commits to and deploys evidence-based techniques.
Process & Quality Improvement – The ability to analyze and design or improve an organizational process, including incorporating the principles of
high reliability, continuous quality improvement, and user-centered design.
Project Management – The ability to plan, execute, and oversee a multi-year, large-scale project involving significant resources, scope, and impact.
Examples include the construction of a major building, implementation of a new enterprise-wide information system, or development of a new service line.
RE L ATI O N S
Leading, through example and actions, to create an organizational climate that values employees from all backgrounds, provides a healthy and energizing
environment in which to work, and encourages everyone’s ongoing development.
Collaboration – The ability to work cooperatively and inclusively with other individuals and/or teams they do not formally lead; working together, as
opposed to working separately or competitively.
Impact & Influence – The ability to persuade, convince, influence, or impress others (individuals or groups) in order to get them to go along with or to
support one’s opinion or position. The “key” is understanding others’ interests and motivations, in order to have a specific impact, effect, or impression
on them and/or convince them to take a specific course of action.
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R E L ATI O N S ( c o n ’ t )
Interpersonal Understanding – The ability to accurately hear and understand the unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns
of others, especially those who may represent diverse backgrounds and very different worldviews. Levels of proficiency relate to the increasing
complexity and depth of understanding, as well as openness to perspectives very different from one’s own.
Talent Development – The ability to build the breadth and depth of the organization’s human capability and professionalism, including supporting
top-performing people and taking a personal interest in coaching and mentoring high-potential leaders.
Team Leadership – The ability to lead groups of people toward shared visions and goals, from forming a team that possesses balanced capabilities, to
setting its mission, values, and norms, and holding team members accountable individually and as a group for results.
TR A N S F O RMATI ON
Creating and implementing compelling and inclusive change processes in support of improving health quality, efficiency, and access.
Change Leadership – The ability to energize stakeholders and sustain their commitment to changes in approaches, processes, and strategies.
Information Seeking – An underlying curiosity and desire to know more about things, people, and issues, including the desire for knowledge and
staying current with health, organizational, industry, and professional trends and developments. It includes pressing for more precise information;
resolving discrepancies by asking a series of questions; and scanning for potential opportunities or information that may be of future use, as well as
staying current and seeking best practices for adoption.
Innovation – The ability to approach one’s work and the organization in new and breakthrough ways, including applying complex concepts,
developing creative new solutions, or adapting previous solutions in promising new ways.
Strategic Orientation – The ability to consider the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and
develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.
ENA B L I N G CO M P E T E NC Y D O MA I NS
VA LU E S
Understanding and utilizing personal, professional, and organizational values to guide decision-making.
Professional & Social Responsibility – The demonstration of ethics, sound professional practices, social accountability, and community stewardship.
Acting in ways that are consistent with one’s values and what one says is important.
H E A LTH S YS TE M AWA RENES S & BUS INES S L ITER AC Y
Understanding the health system’s current business and operating frameworks as well as the dynamic context within which they operate (e.g., community,
competitive, human resources, financial, legal, policy, and environmental).
Financial Skills – The ability to understand and explain financial and accounting information, prepare and manage budgets, and make sound longterm investment decisions.
Human Resource Management – The ability to implement staff development and other management practices that represent contemporary best
practices, comply with legal and regulatory requirements, and optimize the performance of the workforce, including performance assessments,
alternative compensation and benefit methods, and the alignment of human resource practices and processes to meet the strategic goals of the
organization.
Information Technology Management – The ability to see the potential for administrative and clinical technologies to support process and
performance improvement. Actively sponsors the continuous seeking of enhanced technological capabilities.
S E L F -AWA R E N E S S & S EL F-DE V ELO PM ENT
Ongoing habits and actions taken to continuously improve self-knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, and well-being.
Self-Awareness – The ability to have an accurate view of one’s own strengths and development needs, including the impact that one has on others. A
willingness to address development needs through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches.
Self-Confidence – A belief in one’s own capability to successfully accomplish their work. This includes confidence in one’s ability as expressed in
increasingly challenging circumstances, and confidence in one’s decisions or opinions.
Well-Being – Establishes habits supporting well-being, and creates a work climate supportive of the total health of oneself and others. This includes
role-modeling healthy habits and practices, and monitoring internal and external environments for opportunities to improve health.
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AC TION COMPE TENC Y DOMAINS
The Action Competency Domains include:
Boundary Spanning, Execution, Transformation,
and Relations. Definitions for each domain
and the related competencies and competency
levels are provided below.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Relations
[ 10 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
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Enabling
Competency
Domains
B O U N D A R Y S PA N N I N G
B O U N D A R Y S PA N N I N G
Optimizing relationships between a leader’s span
of control and the departments, organizations,
communities, and/or broader networks within
which it operates.
• Community Collaboration
• Organizational Awareness
• Relationship & Network Development
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
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Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 11 ]
B O U N D A R Y S PA N N I N G
Community Collaboration
Boundary Spanning
The ability to align one’s own and the organization’s priorities with the needs and
values of the community, including its cultural and ethnocentric values, and to
move health forward in line with population-based wellness needs and national
health agenda.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Responds Appropriately to Community Needs – Follows through, when asked, on inquiries,
requests, complaints; Keeps stakeholders up-to-date about progress of projects or other events that
impact them
2
Maintains Clear Communication – Maintains clear communication with community leaders and
constituents regarding mutual expectations; Monitors community satisfaction and potential health
needs; Regularly distributes helpful information to key stakeholders; Gives friendly, cheerful service
3
Takes Personal Responsibility for Initiating Collaborative Planning – Corrects problems promptly and
non-defensively; Takes personal responsibility for correcting service problems; Initiates collaborative
planning; Mobilizes resources to meet community health needs and challenges
4
Participates with and Understands the Community – Sponsors activities, takes action, and conducts
data gathering to understand the health needs of the local and regional communities; Gets involved
in the community for the purposes of increasing wellness and presenting a good image of the
organization; Is routinely involved in community health programs, interventions, and services
5
Serves the Community – Takes deliberate action to support the local and regional community’s health
values and needs; Initiates or develops new services to address the specific needs of the population
and how it wants to receive health, recognizing ethnic and cultural differences; Works with other
regional health organizations and constituencies to create comprehensive and integrated systems to
promote long-term wellness by addressing community needs; Advocates for community health needs
and priorities
[ 12 ]
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Enabling
Competency
Domains
B O U N D A R Y S PA N N I N G
Organizational Awareness
Boundary Spanning
The ability to understand and learn the formal and informal decision-making
structures and power relationships in an organization or industry (e.g.,
stakeholders, suppliers). This includes the ability to identify who the real decision
makers are and the individuals who can influence them, and to predict how new
events will affect individuals and groups within the organization.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Uses Formal Structure – Uses the formal structure or hierarchy of an organization to get things done;
Understands chain of command, positional power, rules and regulations, and policies and procedures
2
Applies Understanding of Informal Structure – Uses the informal structure of an organization when the
formal structure does not work as well as desired; Recognizes key actors and decision influencers; Applies this
knowledge when formal structure does not work as well as desired
3
Adapts Actions to Climate and Culture – Recognizes norms and values of an organization, including the
unspoken guidelines about what people are and are not comfortable doing, and what is and is not possible at
certain times or by people in certain positions; Adopts the “language and feel” of the organization; Uses formats
and terminology that reflect the environment
4
Considers Priorities and Values of Multiple Constituencies – Takes time to become familiar with the
expectations, priorities, and values of health’s many stakeholders (e.g., physicians, nurses, patients, staff,
professionals, families, community leaders); Uses this understanding to build coalitions and consensus
around the organization’s vision, priorities, and national health and wellness agendas; Recognizes and/or uses
ongoing power and political relationships within the constituencies (alliances, rivalries) with a clear sense of
organizational impact
5
Acts Using Insights of Stakeholders’ Underlying History and Issues – Addresses the deeper reasons for
organization, industry, and stakeholder actions, such as the underlying cultural, ethnic, economic, and
demographic history and traditions; Uses these insights to gain long- term support for the creation of local,
regional, and national or international integrated health systems that achieve collective agendas for health
and wellness
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[ 13 ]
B O U N D A R Y S PA N N I N G
Relationship & Network Development
The ability to establish, build, and sustain professional contacts for the purpose of
building networks of people with similar goals and that support similar interests.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Develops or Sustains Informal Contacts – Makes and sustains informal contacts that extend beyond formal
work relationships; Is approachable; Can engage in “small talk” and informal conversations
2
Builds Rapport with Associates – Maintains friendly relations and rapport with work contacts; Attends events
with associates and other business contacts that provide informal mingling such as business meals, civic events,
and recreational outings; Finds areas in common with associates and uses them to build friendly relations
3
Sustains Formal Contacts – Organizes activities or social gatherings designed to improve or strengthen
relationships with others; Creates forums for conducting business; Participates in a broad range of relationships
with others who have the potential to become strong business allies
4
Establishes Important Relationships with Key Leaders – Works to meet key people in the health industry,
the community, and other constituencies; Identifies the “movers and shakers” — today and the future —
and establishes good working relationships with them
5
Builds and Sustains Strong Personal Networks – Builds personal relationships with colleagues such that one
can ask and readily receive favors and requests; Maintains contacts with others in the field for mutual assistance;
Can call on others for support and, if needed, personal testimonials and references; Develops reputation as
someone important to know in their area of expertise
[ 14 ]
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Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
EXECUTION
Translating vision and strategy into actions
supporting optimal organizational performance.









Accountability
Achievement Orientation
Analytical Thinking
Communication Skills 1 – Writing
Communication Skills 2 – Speaking & Facilitating
Initiative
Performance Measurement
Process & Quality Improvement
Project Management
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Relations
[ 15 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
Accountability
The ability to hold people accountable to standards of performance or ensure
compliance by effectively and appropriately using the power of one’s position or
personality, with the long-term good of the organization in mind.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Communicates Requirements and Expectations – Gives basic directions; Makes needs and requirements reasonably
clear; Ensures understanding of task requirements and performance expectations; Explicitly delegates details of routine
tasks in order to free self for broader and/or longer-range considerations
2
Sets Limits – Establishes high but achievable performance, quality, and resource utilization standards;
Diplomatically but firmly declines unreasonable requests; Sets limits for others’ behavior and actions
3
Sets and Upholds High Performance Standards – Continuously strives for higher standards of performance;
Communicates clear performance standards to stakeholders; Monitors performance against clear standards; Issues
clear warnings about consequences for non-performance; Ensures promised results are achieved; Shares results
with stakeholders
4
Addresses Performance Problems – Openly and directly addresses individual and team performance shortfalls
and problems; Holds people accountable for performance; Ensures timely resolution to performance deficiencies;
Appropriately dismisses people for cause
5
Fosters a Culture of Accountability – Creates a culture of strong accountability throughout the organization; Holds
others accountable for setting and upholding high performance and taking timely action to address performance
barriers and problems; Accepts personal responsibility for results of own work and that delegated to others
[ 16 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
Achievement Orientation
A concern for surpassing standards of excellence. Standards may involve
past performance (striving for improvement); objective measures (results
orientation); outperforming others (competitiveness); challenging goals, or
redefining the nature of the standards themselves (innovation).
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Strives to Do Job Well – Tries to do the job well or right; expresses a desire to do better; Expresses frustration at
waste or inefficiency; Delivers expected results in line with job requirements
2
Creates Own Measures of Excellence – Sets standards of personal expectation for excellence in both the quality
and quantity of work; Tracks and measures outcomes against higher and more precise standards than those set
by others; Focuses on new or more precise ways of meeting goals set by others
3
Improves Performance – Makes specific changes in the system or in own work methods to improve
performance; Pursues improvements to make systems work better, faster, at lower cost, more efficiently, and/or
more reliably
4
Sets and Works to Meet Challenging Goals – Establishes “stretch goals” for self and others that are challenging
but realistic; Strives to achieve a unique standard (e.g., “No one had ever done it before.”); Compares specific
measures of baseline performance compared with better performance at a later point in time (e.g., “When we
started this effort, efficiency was 20%; now it is up to 85% and climbing.”)
5
Assesses Risks/Rewards of Potential Actions – Makes decisions, sets priorities, or chooses goals on the basis
of calculated inputs and outputs (e.g., makes explicit considerations of potential profit and risks or return on
investment); Analyzes entrepreneurial opportunities in relation to risks, return on investment, and the scope and
magnitude of the investments, and opportunity costs
6
Takes Calculated Entrepreneurial Risks – Commits significant resources and/or time in the face of uncertain
results if there is potential for significantly increased benefits (e.g., gains beyond incremental performance
improvements, meeting challenging goals)
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 17 ]
EXECUTION
Analytical Thinking
Developing a deeper understanding of a situation, issue, or problem by breaking
it down or tracing its implications step-by-step. It includes organizing the parts
of a situation, issue, or problem systematically; making systematic comparisons
of different features or aspects; setting priorities on a rational basis; and
identifying time sequences, causal relationships, or if-then relationships.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Breaks Down Problems – Breaks problems into lists of tasks or activities; Develops lists that can be communicated
clearly to others
2
Identifies Basic Relationships – Identifies the cause-and-effect relationship between two aspects of a situation;
Evaluates situations according to pros and cons; sorts out lists of tasks according to defined qualities (e.g.,
sequence, importance)
3
Recognizes Multiple Relationships – Identifies multiple causal links; identifies several potential causes of events,
several consequences of actions, or multi-part chains of events (A leads to B leads to C leads to D); Analyzes
relationships among several parts of a problem or situation (e.g., anticipates obstacles and thinks ahead about
next steps, in detail with multiple steps)
4
Develops Complex Plans or Analyses – Identifies multiple elements of a problem and breaks down each of those
elements in detail,showing casual relationships between them; Peels back multiple layers of a problem; Uses
several analytical techniques to identify potential solutions and weigh the value of each
[ 18 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
Communication Skills 1 – Writing
The ability to use written communications in formal and informal situations to
convey meaning, build shared understanding, and productively move agendas
forward.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Uses Generally Accepted English Grammar – Uses subject-verb agreement and parallel structure; Uses rules of
punctuation and sentence and paragraph construction; Uses concise thematic construction
2
Writes Clearly and Persuasively – Uses first-person appropriately; avoids use of generalities and imprecise
language (e.g., clichés); ensures technical material is conveyed clearly according to the audience
3
Prepares Effective Written Business Cases and Reports – Uses accurate and complete presentation of facts; Uses
logical presentation of arguments pro and con; Develops well-reasoned recommendations; Effectively balances
writing with graphical communications (e.g., charts, scorecards); Prepares concise executive summaries
Communication Skills 2 – Speaking & Facilitating
The ability to use spoken communications in formal and informal situations to convey meaning, build shared understanding, and
productively move agendas forward.
Level
Level Description
1
Speaks Clearly and Effectively – Uses effective articulation, volume, word choice, and tone; Conveys meaning
clearly and efficiently; Checks for understanding as appropriate
2
Prepares Effective Oral Presentations – Identifies audience’s interests, needs, and level of understanding;
Uses understanding of audience to tailor presentation content, structure, and length; Seeks feedback on
presentation plans
3
Presents Persuasively – Uses clear and understandable voice that is free of extraneous phrases (i.e., “uh” and
“you know”); Uses effective audiovisual media (presentation software, exhibits, etc.); Stays on topic; Engages in
non-defensive Q&A; Stays within time allotment; Changes approach as needed based on audience response
4
Facilitates Group Interactions – Demonstrates effective meeting management techniques (e.g., agenda
development; clarifying purpose and goals; time management); Uses varied communication management
techniques (e.g., brainstorming, consensus building, group problem solving, and conflict resolution); Ensures all
group members are encouraged to participate
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 19 ]
EXECUTION
Initiative
Identifying a problem, obstacle, or opportunity and taking action in light of this
identification to address current or future problems or opportunities. Initiative
emphasizes proactively doing things and not simply thinking about future
actions. Levels of proficiency relate to the time scale of focus, moving from
addressing current situations to acting on long-term future opportunities or
problems.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
[ 20 ]
Level Description
1
Reacts to Short-term Opportunities and Problems – Recognizes and reacts to present opportunities; Reacts to
present problems, including overcoming obstacles
2
Responds Decisively in Time-sensitive Situations – Acts quickly and decisively in a crisis or other time-sensitive
situation; Acts with a sense of urgency when the norm is to wait, study the situation, and hope the problem will
resolve itself
3
Looks Ahead to Take Action in the Short-term – Anticipates short-term opportunities, obstacles, and problems
(e.g., next few days, weeks, or months); Takes action to create an opportunity, prevent problems, or avoid future
crisis, looking ahead within a three-month time frame
4
Takes Action on Longer-term Opportunities – Anticipates longer-term opportunities, problems, and obstacles;
Proactively takes action to create an opportunity or avoid future crisis, looking ahead 4-12 months
5
Acts Over a Year Ahead – Scans for environmental inflection points to anticipate changes, future opportunities, and
potential crises that others may not see; Anticipates and takes action to create an opportunity or avoid future crisis
over a year ahead
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
Performance Measurement
The ability to understand and use statistical and financial metrics and methods
to set goals and measure clinical as well as organizational performance; commits
to and deploys evidence-based techniques.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Monitors Indicators of Performance – Uses knowledge of customers, markets, and financial and management
accounting to track organization performance and financial results; Implements basic patient tracking (e.g.,
registration, invoicing, third-party payer) and operational (e.g., numbers of procedures, equipment usage)
measurement systems; Reports results in an accurate, timely manner that clearly shows organization performance
2
Monitors a “Scorecard” of Quantitative and Qualitative Measures – Tracks financial, customer, quality, and
employee performance measures; Uses patient and constituent satisfaction scores, as well as demographic and
epidemiological statistics to set organizational priorities, plans, and investments; Gathers both quantitative and
qualitative information on customer perceptions, market position, and financial viability; Tracks high-incidence
procedures and conditions; Establishes procedures based on evidence; Ensures medical professionals undergo
quality reviews; Uses measurement systems to determine “early warning” as well as “rear window” indicators
3
Uses Evidence-based Approaches to Support Community Wellness – Monitors community wellness; Measures
organization success by tracking community wellness and performance against national criteria and priorities;
Uses advanced warning measures to enable the movement of people, equipment, and resources; Anticipates
community needs; Ensures timeliness, effectiveness, and efficiency of services; Advocates for treatment and
other care decisions that are evidenced based and patient/customer centered
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 21 ]
EXECUTION
Process & Quality Improvement
The ability to analyze and design or improve an organizational process,
including incorporating the principles of high reliability, continuous quality
improvement, and user-centered design.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
[ 22 ]
Level Description
1
Conducts Process Flow Analyses – Uses process mapping and analysis applications; Maps process steps;
Identifies key decision points; Determines staffing requirements (numbers, costs and essential knowledge, skills
and other attributes), cost implications, and service implications
2
Benchmarks Good Processes and Practices – Conducts benchmarking and best practices research to improve
both clinical and non-clinical organizational practices; Understands customer service and satisfaction drivers;
Determines costs and revenue implications of adopting new practices;
3
Evaluates Organization Structure and Design – Assesses the advantages and disadvantages of current and
alternative organizing structures (e.g., functional, departmental, matrix, service line, etc.); Understands basic
differences in provider structures (e.g., retail clinics, practice sites, teaching hospitals, community hospitals, subacute providers); Uses understanding of organization structure to design performance improvement strategies
4
Works with Governance to Improve Performance – Understands governance practices, including board
relations, committee structure, and fiduciary, ethics, and clinical review responsibilities; Defines role and
responsibilities of foundations and other auxiliary organizations; Uses key governing and regulatory
organizations such as state, county, and city governments; Uses organization governance to enhance quality,
customer satisfaction, and performance
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
EXECUTION
Project Management
The ability to plan, execute, and oversee a multi-year, large-scale project
involving significant resources, scope, and impact. Examples include the
construction of a major building, implementation of a new enterprise-wide
information system, or development of a new service line.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Prepares a Detailed Project Plan – Uses project management tools/applications; Establishes phases and
steps with realistic timelines; Identifies required knowledge, skills, and abilities of team and vendors; Selects
team; Identifies selection and contracting processes and criteria and selects vendor; Identifies performance
requirements, measurement systems, and tracking and reporting processes; Establishes budget
2
Manages Projects Effectively – Tracks performance against plan and budget; Communicates progress with
vendors and team members; Reinforces responsibilities and accountabilities; Reports project outcomes; Adjusts
plan and re-projects; Ensures delivery within prescribed timeframes and budget
3
Provides Project Oversight and Sponsorship – Identifies project performance requirements, including financing
and ROI; Selects manager; Provides project plan and major decision review and oversight; Acquires resources;
Manages major obstacles; Provides project performance reporting review and problem solving
[ 23 ]
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
R E L AT I O N S
R E L AT I O N S
Leading, through example and actions, to create
an organizational climate that values employees
from all backgrounds, provides a healthy and
energizing environment in which to work, and
encourages everyone’s ongoing development.





Collaboration
Impact and Influence
Interpersonal Understanding
Talent Development
Team Leadership
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
[ 24 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
R E L AT I O N S
Collaboration
Boundary Spanning
The ability to work cooperatively and inclusively with other individuals and/
or teams they do not formally lead; working together, as opposed to working
separately or competitively.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Works Cooperatively – Supports team decisions; Does their share of the work; Keeps other team members
informed and up-to-date about what is happening in the group; Shares all relevant or useful information
2
Expresses Positive Attitudes and Expectations of Team or Team Members – Speaks favorably and optimistically
about team members’ capabilities and expected contributions; Speaks of team members in positive terms, either
to the team member directly or to a third party; Develops effective working interactions with teammates
3
Solicits Input – Genuinely values others’ input and expertise; Actively seeks input to increase the quality of
solutions developed; Demonstrates willingness to learn from peers, direct reports, service recipients and other
stakeholders; Solicits ideas and opinions to help form specific decisions or plans; Works to create a shared mindset
4
Encourages Others – Publicly credits others who have performed well; Encourages others; Empowers others
5
Builds Commitment to Collaborations – Promotes good working relationships regardless of personal likes or
dislikes; Identifies and breaks down barriers to good working relationships across groups; Actively builds morale
and cooperation within the team (e.g., by creating symbols of group identity, recognition activities and/or other
actions to build pride and cohesiveness); Encourages or facilitates beneficial resolutions to conflict; Creates
conditions for high-performing teams
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 25 ]
R E L AT I O N S
Impact & Influence
The ability to persuade, convince, influence, or impress others (individuals or
groups) in order to get them to go along with or to support one’s opinion or
position. The “key” is understanding others’ interests and motivations, in order
to have a specific impact, effect, or impression on them and/or convince them
to take a specific course of action.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Expresses Logical Intention for Action – Intends to have a specific effect or impact; Communicates intentions;
Expresses concern with reputation, status, appearance, etc.
2
Takes a Single Approach to Persuade – Uses direct persuasion in a discussion or presentation; Appeals to reason,
data, or others’ self- interest; Uses concrete examples, visual aids, or demonstrations
3
Takes Multiple Approaches to Persuade – Identifies two or more alternative approaches to persuade; Includes
careful preparation of data for presentation; Makes two or more different arguments or points in a presentation
or a discussion; Uses multiple points of view and delivery alternatives
4
Calculates Impact of Actions or Words – Analyzes the needs, interests, and expectations of key stakeholders;
Anticipates the effect of an action or other detail on people’s image of the speaker; Prepares for others’ reactions;
Tailors messages to interests and needs of audience; Aligns persuasion actions for targeted effects or impact;
Takes a well-thought- out dramatic or unusual action in order to have a specific impact
5
Uses Indirect Influence – Uses chains of indirect influence: “Get A to show B so B will tell C such-and-such”;
Adapts influence strategies to specific audiences; Strategically enlists endorsements of others (e.g., experts or
other third parties) for specific audiences
6
Uses Complex Influence Strategies – Assembles coalitions; Builds “behind-the-scenes” support for ideas; Uses
an in-depth understanding of the interactions within a group to move toward a specific position (e.g., changing
approaches to different individuals to have specific effects)
[ 26 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
R E L AT I O N S
Interpersonal Understanding
The ability to accurately hear and understand the unspoken or partly
expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others, especially those who
may represent diverse backgrounds and very different worldviews. Levels of
proficiency relate to the increasing complexity and depth of understanding,
as well as openness to perspectives very different from one’s own.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Recognizes Emotions and Concerns of Others – Recognizes emotion by reading body language, facial
expression, and/or tone of voice; Attends to thoughts and concerns (spoken and unspoken) displayed by others
2
Interprets Emotions and Verbal Content – Understands both emotion (by reading body language, facial
expression, and/or tone of voice) and the content of what the person is saying; Accurately interprets emotion
and content of what others say; Recognizes when the emotion and content do not appear to be in sync
3
Commits to Understanding Others – Takes time to get to know people beyond superficial or job-related
information; Genuinely seeks to understand people as individuals and their points of view; Uses insights gained
from the knowledge of others to know “where they are coming from” or why they act in certain ways
4
Displays Sensitivity to Diverse Backgrounds – Is sensitive to diverse backgrounds of individuals and groups;
Understands their differences with an eye toward accommodating or appreciating them; Displays an in-depth
understanding of the ongoing reasons for a person’s behavior or responses
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 27 ]
5
Actively Increases Diversity and Inclusion – Uses own insights and perceptions to create and support greater
diversity within their organization; Uses understanding to shape future care scenarios to more inclusively
serve different community and demographic groups; Sets and monitors progress in achieving diversitysupportive goals
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
R E L AT I O N S
Talent Development
Boundary Spanning
The ability to build the breadth and depth of the organization’s human
capability and professionalism, including supporting top-performing people
and taking a personal interest in coaching and mentoring high-potential
leaders.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Expresses Positive Expectations of Others – Makes positive comments regarding others’ developmental future,
particularly those whom others might see as not having high potential; Believes others want to, and/or can learn
to, improve their performance
2
Gives Short-Term, Task-Oriented Instruction – Gives detailed instructions and/or on-the-job demonstrations;
Provides specific helpful suggestions
3
Provides Constructive Feedback and Support – Gives directions or demonstrations with reasons or rationale as
a training strategy; Provides practical support or assistance to make an assignment easier for others; Volunteers
additional resources, tools, information, and expert advice; Asks questions, gives tests, or uses other methods
to verify that others have understood explanation or directions; Gives feedback in balanced, behavioral, and
constructive manner; Provides constructive development expectations
4
Supports Ongoing Development – Uses surveys, assessment tools, and personal engagement to develop a
comprehensive understanding of talent strengths and needs in the organization; Actively supports resource
investments to close talent gaps; Is a vocal supporter of growing talent and capability; Demonstrates
commitment to developing talent by investing resources; Provides opportunities for more responsibility and
“stretch assignments”
5
Acts as a Developer of Talent – Recognizes that developing people in the organization is a key priority and
accountability; Learns who the organization’s “rising stars” are and mentors them; Participates in formal
development and learning programs, occasionally serving as teacher/facilitator; Ensures that talent reviews are
robust and current; Serves as a coach for potential successors to their own and other key positions
6
Develops Health Industry Talent – Contributes personal time and energy to mentoring and improving
healthcare leadership industry-wide; Develops a vision of top leadership requirements; Works with industry
colleagues to implement a vision; Serves as a coach/faculty for industry leadership development programs
[ 28 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
R E L AT I O N S
Team Leadership
Boundary Spanning
The ability to lead groups of people toward shared visions and goals, from
forming a team that possesses balanced capabilities, to setting its mission,
values, and norms, and holding team members accountable individually and
as a group for results.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Manages Team Meetings Well – Conducts efficient and effective meetings; States meeting agendas and
objectives; Controls time and pace; Makes assignments
2
Keeps People Informed – Provides essential information for decision making and fulfillment of responsibilities
individually and collectively; Lets people affected by the team know what is happening and the status of
decisions; Explains the reasons behind a decision promptly and candidly
3
Promotes Team Effectiveness – Creates the conditions that enable the team to perform at its best (e.g., setting
clear direction, providing appropriate structure, getting the right people); Determines team membership
(including selection and dismissal), team assignments, performance management, and team development
actions in a manner that promotes team morale, productivity and well-being; Obtains input from others to
promote the effectiveness of the group or process; Builds team spirit for purposes of promoting effectiveness
4
Obtains Resources/Takes Care of the Team – Obtains needed personnel, resources, and information to meet
team goals; Holds team members accountable for their contributions to team success, including bringing team
resources to their assistance; Protects the group and its reputation in the larger organization or the community at
large; Provides or secures needed support and development for both the individuals and the team as a whole
5
Demonstrates Leadership – Establishes norms for team behavior; Personally models these norms; Takes
appropriate action when norms are violated; Works with team members to gain their personal commitment
and energy to the team mission, goals, and norms; Uses own positional power, trust, respect of others, and
relationships to address obstacles that the team meets; Coaches and develops team members toward high
performance
6
Is a Role Model for Leadership – Is recognized throughout the health industry as an example of outstanding
leadership; Provides guidance and perspectives on leading others to peers and colleagues outside the
organization; Takes an active role in spreading leadership approaches across the industry; Is recognized by the
industry as a leader whose leadership approaches are considered best practice; Is sought out for perspective and
guidance in the field
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 29 ]
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
Creating and implementing compelling and
inclusive change processes in support of
improving health quality, efficiency,
and access.




Change Leadership
Information Seeking
Innovation
Strategic Orientation
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
[ 30 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
Change Leadership
Boundary Spanning
The ability to energize stakeholders and sustain their
commitment to changes in approaches, processes, and
strategies.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Identifies Areas for Change – Publicly defines one or more specific areas where change is needed; Identifies what
needs to change
2
Expresses Vision for Change – Defines an explicit vision for change (i.e., what should be different and how)’
Modifies or redefines a previous vision in specific terms; Outlines strategies for change
3
Ensures Change Messages are Heard – Delivers vision and messages about changes to everyone affected;
Systematically repeats messages as needed; Posts change messages (electronically and physically — e.g., banners,
plaques, or other public reminders); Provides opportunities for people to engage in change initiatives
4
Challenge Status Quo – Publicly challenges the status quo through clear and compelling identification of its
risks to organizational success; Articulates a clear vision of needed change; Creates a realistic sense of crisis or a
disequilibrium in order to prepare the ground for change; Energizes others for change
5
Visibly Reinforces Change Vision – Takes a dramatic action (other than giving a speech) to catalyze or reinforce the
change effort; Personally exemplifies or embodies the desired change through strong, symbolic actions consistent
with the change (e.g., committing to goals that are unobtainable without change)
6
Manages Distress During the Change Process – Maintains an eye on mission, values, and strategic goals in times
of stress and uncertainty; Provides focus and consistency to advance change initiatives; Displays quiet confidence
in the progress and benefits of change; Provides direction for overcoming adversity and resistance to change;
Defines the vision for the next wave of change
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 31 ]
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
Information Seeking
Boundary Spanning
An underlying curiosity and desire to know more about
things, people, and issues, including the desire for
knowledge and staying current with health, organizational,
industry, and professional trends and developments. It
includes pressing for more precise information; resolving
discrepancies by asking a series of questions; and scanning
for potential opportunities or information that may be
of future use, as well as staying current and seeking best
practices for adoption.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
[ 32 ]
Level Description
1
Consults Available Resources – Asks direct questions of the people who are knowledgeable about the situation,
such as people who are directly involved; Uses readily available information, or consults other resources
2
Investigates Beyond Routine Questions – Conducts preliminary investigations regarding a problem or situation
beyond routine questioning; Finds those closest to the problem and investigates further, such as asking, “What
happened?”
3
Delves Deeper – Asks a series of probing questions to get at the root of a situation, a problem, or a potential
opportunity below the surface issues presented; Calls on others who are not personally involved to get their
perspective, background information, experience, etc.; Does not stop with the first answer; finds out why
something happened; Seeks comprehensive information, including expecting complexity
4
Conducts Research to Maintain Knowledge – Makes a systematic effort over a specific period of time to obtain
needed data or feedback; Conducts in-depth investigation from unusual sources; Commissions others to conduct
formal research (e.g., market, financial, competitive) through media, market intelligence services, and/or other
resources regarding practices in health and other industries for the purpose of keeping current; Seeks expert
perspectives
5
Is a Recognized User of Best Practices – Establishes ongoing systems or habits to maintain current information
about the organization (e.g., conducts rounds, holds regular informal meetings/town halls); Scans media and
organizations that identify and disseminate best practices; Enlists individuals to conduct ongoing information
gathering; Adopts the best practices from other industries in addition to healthcare
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
Innovation
Boundary Spanning
The ability to approach one’s work and the organization in
new and breakthrough ways, including applying complex
concepts, developing creative new solutions, or adapting
previous solutions in promising new ways.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Recognizes Patterns Based on Prior Experience – Sees patterns, trends, or missing pieces/linkages in information;
Notices when a current situation is similar or dissimilar to a past situation, identifies the similarities and/or
differences, and takes action accordingly
2
Applies Proven Concepts or Trends – Looks at current situations using knowledge of theoretical principles, past
occurrences and/or trends; Applies and modifies concepts or methods appropriately
3
Clarifies Complex Ideas or Situations – Provides new perspective on challenges by making complex ideas or
situations clearer, simpler, and/or more understandable (e.g., re-framing the problem, use of analogy); Assembles
ideas, issues, and observations into a clear and useful explanation; Restates existing observations or knowledge
in a simpler fashion; Translates intricate technical information into terms everyone can understand; “boils down”
information
4
Creates New Concepts or Breakthrough Thinking – Creates new ways of explaining situations or resolving
problems that are not obvious to others and not based on prior experience; Looks at things in new ways that yield
new or innovative approaches — breakthrough thinking; Shifts the paradigm by creating a new line of thought
5
Fosters an Innovation-Supportive Culture – Creates platforms and/or processes that support staff in identifying
and pursuing new approaches to their work; encourages innovative thinkers to develop and test their ideas; Seeks
partnerships and other collaborations that can provide support for innovation
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 33 ]
T R A N S F O R M AT I O N
Strategic Orientation
Boundary Spanning
The ability to consider the business, demographic, ethnocultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions
and develop strategies that continually improve the longterm success and viability of the organization.
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Conducts Environmental Scanning – Performs analyses that identify environmental forces shaping the
organization (including the competitive market, governmental and regulatory, public opinion, scientific,
and technological forces); Identifies the strengths and challenges of the organization in light of these forces
today and into the future; Identifies the social and economic positioning the organization needs in light of the
environmental scan
2
Develops Strategy to Address Environmental Forces – Positions the organization in light of environmental forces
over the next three to five years; Develops strategic goals and plans for the organization that take advantage of its
strengths, addresses its shortcomings, builds on opportunities, and attempts to minimize environmental threats;
Aligns organizational units and investment strategy (financial, people, technology, materials) to achieve strategy
3
Aligns Organization to Address Long-term Environment – Understands the forces that are shaping health over
the next 5 to 10 years (market, social, cultural, economic, and political); Aligns strategy, structure, and/or people
with the long-term environment; Develops a long-term organizational strategy (including competitive, financial,
structural, and people elements) to position the organization for success over the next 10 years
4
Shapes Industry Strategy – Develops a perspective on long-term health and wellness trends that is respected by
colleagues and leading policymakers; Helps to shape industry-level competitive positioning through policymaking
forums,industry-specific strategic groups and associations
[ 34 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
ENABLING COMPE TENC Y DOMAINS
The Enabling Competency Domains include: Values,
Health System Awareness & Business Literacy, and
Self-Awareness & Self-Development. Definitions for
each domain and the related competencies and
competency levels are provided below.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Relations
[ 35 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
VA LU E S
VA LU E S
Understanding and utilizing personal,
professional, and organizational values
to guide decision-making
• Professional & Social Responsibility
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Relations
[ 36 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
VA LU E S
Professional & Social Responsibility
The demonstration of ethics, sound professional practices,
social accountability, and community stewardship. Acting in
ways that are consistent with one’s values and what one says is
important.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Acts Openly and Honestly – Actions are consistent with organization’s expressed core values; Interacts with staff
and other stakeholders in an open and truthful manner; Expresses their beliefs even when the message may not
be welcome; Shares information, insights, or comments when it would be easier to refrain from doing so
2
Promotes Organizational Integrity – Ensures that organization adheres to honesty and fair dealing with all
constituencies, including employees and community stakeholders; Promotes the development of professional
roles/values that are compatible with the improvement of health and wellness; Serves with a focus on the greater
good; Strives to uphold trustworthiness
3
Maintains Social Accountability – Develops and implements systems for tracking and sustaining commitments to
staff, customers and the community; Acknowledges issues and contributing factors; Publicly admits to mistakes;
Establishes approaches to handling issues and mistakes with openness, honesty, and fairness
4
Promotes Community Stewardship – Develops professional roles/values supporting the improvement of
individual and population health; Commits to addressing the broader health and wellness needs of the total
population, including adapting new and inclusive approaches that address diverse cultural attitudes about
health; Ensures sound organizational stewardship and accountability for dealing with all stakeholders honestly
and equitably
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 37 ]
H E A LT H S Y S T E M A W A R E N E S S & B U S I N E S S L I T E R A C Y
H E A LT H S YS T EM S & B U S I NE S S L I TE R AC Y
Understanding the health system’s current
business and operating frameworks as well
as the dynamic context within which they
operate (e.g., community, competitive, human
resources,financial, legal, policy, and environmental)
• Financial Skills
• Human Resource Management

Information Technology Management
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Relations
[ 38 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Enabling
Competency
Domains
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
H E A LT H S Y S T E M A W A R E N E S S & B U S I N E S S L I T E R A C Y
Financial Skills
The ability to understand and explain financial and accounting information,
prepare and manage budgets, and make sound long-term investment decisions.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Explains the Organization’s Financial Metrics and Reports – Uses financial metrics to drive and track the
organization’s success; Explains income statement, balance sheet, cash flow; Communicates indicators of financial
health, including profitability; Understands accounting entries through general ledger to revenue
2
Manages and Assists the Budgeting Process – Develops budgets; Demonstrates expense and revenue
management (unit or department); Manages budget variances, including revisions and corrective actions; Explains
expense sources and management alternatives with implications; Understands sources of revenue including
sensitivity analyses; Uses capital budgeting and asset management techniques
3
Understands Impact of Payment Models – Assesses reimbursement and payment system alternatives; Explains
connections between behaviors of providers and payers; Develops incentives that align priorities with the
organization’s mission and goals; Considers impact of reimbursement and payment systems when assessing
management alternatives
4
Uses Financial and Needs Analyses to Inform Investment Decisions – Analyzes decisions using corporate
financial management concepts (e.g., rate of return, net present value, and cash flow analyses); Analyzes trends in
population, disease, and utilization data; Understands principles of insurance rating, actuarial risk, and shared risk
5
Develops Long-term Financial Plans – Develops long-term plans for funding growth and development (e.g., new
services, clinical programs, and methods for individual and community engagement); Develops long- term capital
spending plans for building, renovation and expansion; Develops funding sources and their financial implications
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 39 ]
H E A LT H S Y S T E M A W A R E N E S S & B U S I N E S S L I T E R A C Y
Human Resource Management
The ability to implement staff development and other management practices
that represent contemporary best practices, comply with legal and regulatory
requirements, and optimize the performance of the workforce, including
performance assessments, alternative compensation and benefit methods, and
the alignment of human resource practices and processes to meet the strategic
goals of the organization.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
[ 40 ]
Level Description
1
Manages with an Understanding of Basic Employment Processes and Law – Demonstrates basic knowledge
of employment management principles, policies, and law in relation to hiring, promotion, or dismissal; Learns
and applies organization-specific human resources policies and procedures; ; Demonstrates an understanding of
union/labor principles and practices (e.g., contracting, negotiations, grievance process, mediation)
2
Uses Alternative Compensation and Benefit Programs – Creates and revises job descriptions to support
appropriate evaluation and grading; Understands compensation structures, including: market pricing, pay delivery
models and their implications, benefits and their role in total compensation, and union wage and hour contract
provisions; Uses compensation, benefit, and incentive programs to optimize performance of diverse employee
stakeholders; Conducts performance assessments; Evaluates compensation using market data
3
Aligns Human Resource Functions with Strategy – Aligns the components of human resource functions;
(recruitment and selection, job design and work systems, learning and development, reward and recognition, and
succession planning) to organizational strategy
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
H E A LT H S Y S T E M A W A R E N E S S & B U S I N E S S L I T E R A C Y
Information Technology Management
The ability to see the potential for administrative and clinical technologies to
support process and performance improvement. Actively sponsors the continuous
seeking of enhanced technological capabilities.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Recognizes the Potential of Information Systems in Process and Patient Service Improvement – Maintains
familiarity with current technology for applications such as patient tracking (e.g., registration, billing and records
management, relationship management), financial automation and reporting, and reimbursement management;
Is open to automation of manual processes
2
Champions Information Technology Implementation – Provides staff and clinicians with state-of the-art tools to
access information, record clinical and operational information, and support decisions; Supports use of Webbased diagnostic capabilities; Pursues technologies that enhance patient access, self-service, and engagement;
Develops and resources a long-term (5+ years) information systems plan
3
Seeks and Challenges the Organization to Pursue Leading-Edge Information Technology – Keeps current on the
latest developments in information technology; Identifies new opportunities to use latest information technology
in the organization in ways that fundamentally change how the organization operates or promotes wellness;
Partners with thought leaders and developers to identify and implement breakthrough systems
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 41 ]
S E L F – AWA R E N E S S & S E L F – D E V E LO PM E N T
S E L F -AWA RE N ES S & S EL F- D E VE LO P M E NT
Ongoing habits and actions taken to
continuously improve self-knowledge,
interpersonal effectiveness, and well-being.
• Self-Awareness
• Self-Confidence
• Well-Being
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
[ 42 ]
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Enabling
Competency
Domains
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
S E L F – AWA R E N E S S & S E L F – D E V E LO PM E N T
Self-Awareness
The ability to have an accurate view of one’s own strengths and development
needs, including the impact that one has on others. A willingness to address
development needs through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying
new approaches.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Enabling
Competency
Domains
Level Description
1
Seeks Feedback – Appreciates the need to learn and grow; Routinely seeks feedback from others, including those
who are likely to be critical; Uses feedback in improving performance
2
Improves Own Performance – Regularly reflects on own performance, balancing recognizing success with
opportunities for improvement; Learns from less successful events, missteps, and challenges; Sets annual
improvement goals; Shows openness to coaching
3
Considers the Impact they Have on Others – Reflects on the impact they may have on others prior to making
decisions or taking actions; Chooses behaviors and styles to get the best results based on the situation; Modifies
behaviors in response to informal cues as well as formal feedback; Integrates feedback into personal development
efforts and goals; Tries out new leadership techniques and adopts those with positive impact
4
Pursues Long-term Personal Development – Takes personal responsibility for analyzing future developmental
needs, factoring in accurate self-assessment, feedback from others, personal career goals, and organization
direction; Proactively pursues multi-year personal development, including willingness to pursue fundamental style
and behavior changes as well as mastering new areas of expertise
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
[ 43 ]
S E L F – AWA R E N E S S & S E L F – D E V E LO PM E N T
Self-Confidence
A belief in one’s own capability to successfully accomplish their work. This
includes confidence in one’s ability as expressed in increasingly challenging
circumstances, and confidence in one’s decisions or opinions.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Level
Level Description
1
Acts Confidently within Job or Role – Works without needing direct supervision; Appears confident in person;
Presents self well
2
Acts Confidently at or Slightly Beyond the Limits of their Role – Makes decisions without needing to ask
others; Can make decisions even when others disagree; Acts outside formal role or authority; Acts in uncertain
circumstances
3
States Confidence in Own Ability – Represents their areas of expertise or authority to others, expresses confidence
in their ability to make things happen; Explicitly states appropriate confidence in own judgment or abilities;
Communicates self-assuredness to take on new roles, responsibilities, and challenges
4
Takes on Challenges – Seeks challenging assignments and is excited by a challenge; Looks for and gets new
responsibilities; Speaks up when he or she disagrees with management or others in power; disagrees politely,
stating own view clearly and confidently – even in a conflict
5
Pursues Extremely Challenging Assignments – Willingly takes on extremely challenging assignments; Confronts
management or others with power directly; Can be blunt and bold when necessary
[ 44 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
Enabling
Competency
Domains
S E L F – AWA R E N E S S & S E L F – D E V E LO PM E N T
Well-Being
Establishes habits supporting well-being, and creates a work climate
supportive of the total health of oneself and others. This includes rolemodeling healthy habits and practices, and monitoring internal and external
environments for opportunities to improve health.
Well-being has become widely recognized a growth need across the health
sector, but is not yet an area where we can provide clear, evidence-based
guidance about what constitutes leadership proficiency. We anticipate
developing these definitions as part of our work on Competency Model 3.1.
To receive updates to the model, please email us at info@nchl.org.
Boundary Spanning
Transformation
Action
Competency
Domains
Execution
Health System Awareness
& Business Literacy
Relations
Self-Awareness &
Self-Development
Values
Professional, Organizational, Personal
Enabling
Competency
Domains
[ 45 ]
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
About the National Center for Healthcare Leadership
Established in 2001, the not-for-profit National Center for Healthcare Leadership (NCHL) serves as an catalyst to ensure the availability
of accountable and transformational leadership for our 21st century healthcare needs. Through its support of interorganizational
learning collaboratives, NCHL pursues a vision to improve population health through leadership and organizational excellence. For
more information please visit NCHL’s website at www.nchl.org.
About the Rush University HSM Leadership Center
Revision and revalidation of the NCHL competency model was made possible through the generous support of the HSM Leadership
Center at Rush University. Operating within the HSM Department, The HSM Leadership Center supports a portfolio of experimental
and innovative learning, research, and practice activities to strengthen the mission and impact of healthcare leadership. By
emphasizing collaborations beyond Rush University, the Center also provides a platform through which inter-organizational learning
can be cultivated and accelerated. For more information, please visit www.rushu.rush.edu/hsm.
[ 46 ]
N at i o n a l Cente r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
N at i o n a l Ce nte r fo r H e al t hc are Le ade r s hi p | nc hl. o rg
National Center for Healthcare Leadership
17 N. State Street | Suite 1530 | Chicago, Illinois 60602
www.nchl.org

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